Art auction season heads into second week with strong sales



1. Wide shot pan across sculptures outside entrance to Christie’s auction house, Manhattan
2. Wide shot interior Christie’s gallery displaying contemporary art to go on auction November 11
3. Close up, tilt up, Franz Kline’s “Rue” from 1959 estimated between 3.5 million – 4.5 million US dollars
4. Wide shot an untitled 1963 Mark Rothko estimated between 4 – 6 million US dollars
5. Close up, tilt down, untitled 1963 Mark Rothko estimated between 4 – 6 million US dollars
6. Wide shot 1957 Jasper Johns painting, “Gray Numbers,” estimated between 5 – 7 million US dollars
7. Close up, detail, 1957 Jasper Johns painting, “Gray Numbers,” estimated between 5 – 7 million US dollars
8. Close up, pan across numbers, 1957 Jasper Johns painting, “Gray Numbers,” estimated between 5 – 7 million US dollars
9. Wide shot, 1962 work by Roy Lichtenstein, “Woman with Peanuts,” estimated between 2.5 – 3.5 million US dollars
10. Close up, tilt down, 1962 work by Roy Lichtenstein, “Woman with Peanuts,” estimated between 2.5 – 3.5 million US dollars
11. SOUNDBITE: (English): Jennifer Yum, Christie’s:
“The collection as a whole (collection of Dorothy C. Miller) because Dorothy Miller, as some people may know, was the first curator hired by the Museum of Modern Art. She worked very closely with Alfred H. Barr, who was the famous director who introduced cubism and fauvism and amazing artists to the American public, and made the museum one of the best museums in the world. She worked there for thirty four years, and during her tenure, she introduced post-war art to American as well as European publics.”
12. Wide shot exterior Sotheby’s auction house in Manhattan
13. Workers at Sotheby’s moving a sculpture to install in their pre-auction exhibition
14. Worker at Sotheby’s climbs down a ladder after adjusting a light while installing the exhibition (which was just installed on Friday)
15. Wide shot Mark Rothko’s “No. 8,” painted in 1958, estimated between 8 – 10 million US dollars
16. Close up Mark Rothko’s “No. 8,” painted in 1958, estimated between 8 – 10 million US dollars
17. Close up Willem de Kooning’s “Spike’s Folly 1” from 1959, estimated between 10 – 15 million US dollars
18. Wide shot, Andy Warhol “Oxidation painting,” estimated between 2.2 – 2.8 million US dollars , painting created by the oxidation of uric acid on metallic paint
19. Close up, detail, Andy Warhol “oxidation painting,” estimated 2.2 – 2.8 million US dollars, painting created by the oxidation of uric acid on metallic paint
20. SOUNDBITE: (English): Tobias Meyer, Sotheby’s:
“A good economy will help the collector to make positive decisions about spending money, very easy, that’s very clear. I have the…. the perceived or the mentioned change in the market, in fact, for me, it’s not such a big change. It just becomes more and more quality-driven. I think there was always money for art, there was always money a year ago. You know, a year ago maybe our estimates were a little bit regressive, for the market, for the feeling of the market, but the money was completely there. I think that now it’s just that there’s a slightly more bigger comfort level for certain collectors, that just know that their business is doing better (because of the improved economy) so they feel happier about spending money.”
21. Wide shot, Sotheby’s gallery

STORYLINE:

The fall (autumn) art auctions got underway this week with a number of high-profile works bringing in strong prices as sellers, buoyed by a resuscitated economy, decided to cash in on their top-end pieces, auction house officials said.

Record prices were set for works by Amadeo Modigliani, Fernand Leger and Gustav Klimt.

The art auctions will continue through November.

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