Dead Flowers (Jagger-Richards ’72)



In our version of one of Keith and Mick’s finest vehicles of rural American cultural appropriation, Corey explores the stygian depths of his vocal range, while I explore the wavery air’s-so-thin heights of mine.

It’s ironic, don’t you think?

“Dead Flowers” was written and recorded for the Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers, which was released in 1971 and has probissibly the best Stones album cover (if you didn’t know, ’twas created by Andy Warhol).

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Curiosity Killed The Cat – Down To Earth



1986) They appeared out of nowhere, as if they were transported from a parallel universe wherein blue-eyed soul was seen as rock & roll’s salvation in the late 80s. Likeminded groups like Johnny Hates Jazz, Waterfront, Living in a Box, and Curiosity

Killed the Cat all debuted and disappeared at the same time. Of the four Curiosity Killed the Cat leaned more towards the teen girl population that hung “Smash Hits” posters on their bedroom walls. The band’s lightweight funk and photogenic looks rewarded them with mainstream acceptance in their native England but America didn’t budge. Curiosity Killed the Cat was formed in 1984 by Ben Volpeliere-Pierrot (vocals), Julian Godfrey Brookhouse (guitar), Nicholas Bernard Throp (bass), Michael Drummond (drums), and Toby Anderson (keyboards). While in art school Volpeliere-Pierrot met Throp, who was then in a post-punk group called Twilight Children with the other future members of Curiosity Killed the Cat. After inviting him to sing Volpeliere-Pierrot became the band’s new lead singer. They recorded a track entitled “Curiosity Killed the Cat” which caught the interest of businessman Peter Rosengard, who eventually renamed the band after their song and became their manager. In 1985, Curiosity Killed the Cat was signed to Phonogram, and the group began making their first LP. However, producers Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare were taken off the project, replaced by Stewart Levine; as a result, the album was delayed for nearly a year. The toe-tapping single “Misfit” was released in July 1986, but it was not successful. The band gained much attention after Andy Warhol became a fan; he even did a cameo for the “Misfit” video. In early 1987 “Down to Earth” became a Top-10 hit in the U.K. Two years later the group shortened their appellation to Curiosity. 1992’s “Hang On In There Baby” peaked at No. 3 on the British charts, and the band disappeared from the music scene until they joined the 80s nostalgia Here and Now tour in 2001. ~ Michael Sutton, All Music Guide

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VISIONAIRE 61 LARGER THAN LIFE | CYCY SANDERS | ARTIST COMMERCIALS



VISIONAIRE presents an artist commercial of VISIONAIRE 61 LARGER THAN LIFE by Cycy Sanders.

Remember when Andy Warhol was filmed eating Burger King? How about Salvador Dali’s explanation of Alka Seltzer? Back in the day, artists and brands worked together and changed the game of advertising. For our 25th anniversary, we invited artists to create their own creative commercials inspired by their favorite issue of VISIONAIRE. Through our curatorial partnership with Cadillac House in downtown NYC, we exhibited a selection of these commercials as a gallery installation in 2016.

Ironically, these commercials do not serve their normal purpose of commerce. VISIONAIRE presents this purely as experimental art and non-traditional film, expanding the boundaries of what is considered publishing and the way we view and experience art and fashion.

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