The Dandy Warhols – Bohemian Like You



Buy It Here: http://smarturl.it/jcztl2
Pre-VEVO Play Count: 2,536,332
Official video of The Dandy Warhols performing Bohemian Like You from the album Thirteen Tales From Urban Bohemia.
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Official Website: http://www.dandywarhols.com
See More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheDandyWarholsVEVO

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Pop Art Spotty Eye Halloween Make-Up Tutorial – The Body Shop



It’s the coolest new trend in Halloween make-up – we’ve gone dotty for pop-art make-up this Fright Night. Pop it like crazy with our pow-factor tutorial.

Looking for simple Halloween make-up with a pop of colour? Stand out from the crowd of cats and witches with our pop-art make-up tutorial, the perfect take on the comic book trend.

We’ve used cruelty-free make-up from The Body Shop to come up with a creative and colourful Halloween make-up look that’s totally easy to copy. Just follow the simple steps below to create your pop-art girl make-up…

Step 1: Outline the balloon shape around the area using the 2-in-1 Smoky Gel Liner, then repeat with smaller balloon shapes on the opposite eyebrow.

Step 3: Fill your balloons using the Eye Colour Sticks.

Step 2: Trace your starburst shape with the 2-in-1 Smoky Gel Liner.

Step 4: Fill in your starburst using the Matte Lip Liquid in Goa Magnolia.

Want to recreate our Pop-Art Halloween Make Up Look? Shop the products we’ve used below!

2-in-1 Smoky Gel Liner: https://www.thebodyshop.com/make-up/eye-liners-brows/smoky-2-in-1-gel-liner/p/p000240
Eye Colour Sticks: https://www.thebodyshop.com/make-up/eye-shadow/eye-colour-stick/p/p002441
Matte Lip Liquid: https://www.thebodyshop.com/make-up/lips/matte-lip-liquid/p/p002171

Love this video? Let us know your Halloween make-up look in the comments below, and head over to The Body Shop YouTube channel for even more Halloween make-up tutorials, plus make-up and skincare how-tos.

For more information on The Body Shop or to purchase any of our products, visit http://www.thebodyshop.com or follow us on social media:

Facebook – http://www.facebook.com/thebodyshop
Twitter – http://twitter.com/TheBodyShop
Instagram – http://www.instagram.com/thebodyshop

© 2017 The copyright for the material in this film is owned by or licensed to The Body Shop International Limited. Not for sale. All rights reserved

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DreamFactory presents “INTO ANDY: INSIDE ANDY WARHOL” (A Short Bio Documentary Tribute) © 2003



Andrew Warhola (August 6, 1928 — February 22, 1987), known as Andy Warhol, was an American painter, printmaker, and filmmaker who was a leading figure in the visual art movement known as pop art. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became famous worldwide for his work as a painter, avant-garde filmmaker, record producer, author, and member of highly diverse social circles that included bohemian street people, distinguished intellectuals, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy patrons.
Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books, and feature and documentary films. He coined the widely used expression “15 minutes of fame.” In his hometown of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, The Andy Warhol Museum exists in memory of his life and artwork.
The highest price ever paid for a Warhol painting is $100 million for a 1963 canvas titled Eight Elvises. The private transaction was reported in a 2009 article in The Economist, which described Warhol as the “bellwether of the art market.” $100 million is a benchmark price that only Jackson Pollock, Pablo Picasso, Gustav Klimt and Willem de Kooning have achieved.

Andy Warhol was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on August 6, 1928.[2] He was the fourth child of Ondrej Warhola (died 1942)[3] and Julia (née Zavacka, 1892–1972),[4] whose first child was born in their homeland and died before their move to the U.S. His parents were working-class emigrants from Mikó (now called Miková), in northeastern Slovakia, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Warhol’s father immigrated to the US in 1914, and his mother joined him in 1921, after the death of Andy Warhol’s grandparents. Warhol’s father worked in a coal mine. The family lived at 55 Beelen Street and later at 3252 Dawson Street in the Oakland neighborhood of Pittsburgh.[5] The family was Byzantine Catholic and attended St. John Chrysostom Byzantine Catholic Church. Andy Warhol had two older brothers, Ján and Pavol, who were born in today’s Slovakia. Pavol’s son, James Warhola, became a successful children’s book illustrator.
In third grade, Warhol had chorea, the nervous system disease that causes involuntary movements of the extremities, which is believed to be a complication of scarlet fever and causes skin pigmentation blotchiness.[6] He became a hypochondriac, developing a fear of hospitals and doctors. Often bed-ridden as a child, he became an outcast at school and bonded with his mother.[7] At times when he was confined to bed, he drew, listened to the radio and collected pictures of movie stars around his bed. Warhol later described this period as very important in the development of his personality, skill-set and preferences. When Warhol was 13, his father died in an accident.

Warhol showed early artistic talent and studied commercial art at the School of Fine Arts at Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (now Carnegie Mellon University).[9] In 1949, he moved to New York City and began a career in magazine illustration and advertising. During the 1950s, he gained fame for his whimsical ink drawings of shoe advertisements. These were done in a loose, blotted-ink style, and figured in some of his earliest showings at the Bodley Gallery in New York. With the concurrent rapid expansion of the record industry and the introduction of the vinyl record, Hi-Fi, and stereophonic recordings, RCA Records hired Warhol, along with another freelance artist, Sid Maurer, to design album covers and promotional materials.

Made for Grade 11 History at WDHS. DreamFactory Films (aka Worthiss Pictures) © 2003.

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